On Air with IER: Episode 12

This week: A new study says beneficial cover crops could have a temperature-changing dark side, and a beer maker gave wind power a multi-million dollar spotlight.
13:01

Bird's-Eye View

Every day, people across the world will make decisions or innovations that affect the way Hoosiers live. We’ll track the changes so you’re ready for them.

WARMING PACIFIC WATERS KILLING SALMON

Climate change is causing rising water temperatures in the Pacific Northwest, killing salmon before they can reproduce.
(Popular Science   )

OCEAN COLORS TO CHANGE THIS CENTURY

By the end of the 21st Century many of the world’s oceans will change colors as the level of phytoplankton changes.
(MIT News   )

POLAR BEARS INVADE RUSSIAN ISLAND

Authorities on the Russian island Novaya Zemlya declared a state of emergency after dozens of polar bears moved to the communities in search of food.
(BBC News   )

HUMANS ARE EATING BIG ANIMALS INTO EXTINCTION

A new study attributes the extinction of mammoths and mastodons in North America to human hunting. The hunting of animals such as African elephants, rhinos and whale sharks puts them at risk of the same fate.
(Popular Science   )

SWEDISH PLAN OFFERED AS CLIMATE CHANGE SOLUTION

Swedish scientists say solving the planet's climate change problem requires decarbonization and an expansion of nuclear power.
(New York Times   )

KEY WEST BANS SUNSCREEN HARMFUL TO CORAL REEFS

The Key West City Commission banned the sale of sunscreens containing oxybenzone and octinoxate, which scientists have deemed harmful to coral reefs.
(Miami Herald   )

CHINESE METHANE EMISSIONS CONTINUE RISING

China consumes half the world’s coal and continues to produce more methane gas despite government regulations to reduce emissions, according to a new study.
(New York Times   )

SEEING THE GOOD IN EXTINCTION

The Eastern cougar subspecies was officially declared extinct as of Jan. 22 and removed from the endangered list by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Scientists say this removal could be a good thing.
(National Geographic   )

ROCKS ON THE MENU FOR ALLIGATORS

Researchers thought alligators swallowed stones to help digest their meals or accidentally ingested them in the process of catching their meals. But now they think there might be another explanation.
(Integrated Organismal Biology   )

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With sound science as our base, we present environmental issues in a nonpolitical way. We seek to make science and environmental information available to and useful to all Hoosiers.

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